Episode 096 – Parable of the Lost Son Part 3: Embrace the Grace

Key Passage(s): Luke 15:11-24

It’s easy to forget how much we’ve been forgiven. And when we do so, our relationship with God and others suffers greatly. In this episode of the parable of the lost son, we key in on the younger son and unpack his journey of being lost and then found. And in doing so, we get to marvel at the extravagant grace of God who embraces us despite our faults and failures. But until we allow ourselves to be embraced and changed by this grace, we’ll seek to manipulate and connive in our relationship with God, and we’ll also fail to extend to others the kind of grace God expects from us.

Discussion Questions

  • What was your biggest takeaway from the teaching?
  • How have you traditionally understood this parable with respect to the younger son? How did this teaching confirm or change your prior understanding?
  • Is there any way in which you’ve forgotten how much you’ve been forgiven? If so, how is that negatively impacting your relationship with God? Your relationship with others?
  • Where do you need to embrace God’s grace anew today?
  • Where do you need to extend that kind of grace to others?
  • How will you begin living out the truths of this teaching this week?

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7 Comments

  1. Robi Owens February 11, 2020 at 7:49 am - Reply

    Brad,

    I’m still debating in my mind the motives of the son in wanting to be a hired servant. The way you presented it is that it is a selfish motive where he does not want to be associated with the family… just as a worker.

    I have to ask whether he “wanted” to become a hired servant, or whether he felt like he had so damaged his family that the only way he could be allowed back would be as a hired servant. He had to feel like there was no way the damage he had done was repairable and that there was no way that he would be allowed back as any of the other classes of servant, since they also implied some sort of connection with the family. Was this a selfish motive or a desperate motive? (or both)

    I think we often feel like our sins are so great that there is absolutely no way we can be forgiven and restored in God’s eye.

    Interested in your thoughts!

    • Bill Schmitzer February 11, 2020 at 11:23 am - Reply

      Robi, I like how you put it, was it a selfish motive or desperate motive. As many time as I’ve read and heard this parable I had assumed it was desperation. But now after hearing Brad’s point of view I can see and understand another way of looking at this parable. My take is if the son was selfish than the father showed just how forgiving, gracious and loving he is. I’m not sure if this makes sense but I now have an even higher respect and love for God.

      Bill

      • Brad Gray February 11, 2020 at 11:59 am - Reply

        Really love the dialogue you two have going on here. And Robi, that’s great to continue to debate and wrestle with what you think is going on in the parable. Parables are intended to make us ponder and consider. Thank you both for your thoughts!

        • Angie Crisman February 12, 2020 at 9:35 am - Reply

          I love, love, love this story of God’s faithfulness to “the lost sons”.
          The struggle can be real for most of us…caught in between disobedience and works. I’m so thankful that He hiked up his skirt (so to speak), and ran to me when I was far off. Grace and peace ❤

          P.S. Where can I find a print like the one over your fireplace?

          • Brad Gray February 12, 2020 at 4:57 pm

            Hi Angie, I just sent you an email. Enjoy!

  2. wesley campbell February 11, 2020 at 3:37 pm - Reply

    Brother Brad, I can see where Robi and Brad are coming from! You’ve certainly opened my eyes concerning the son’s motives and the Tremendous Grace of our God!…….Also, thanks for the ” picture “! It now graces the wall in my office. It’s a Blessing to have the opportunity to turn around and see His Name…!

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